2014 CULTURAL DANCE GROUP


To fulfill one of the association's missions to promote the Philippine culture, the association has formed cultural dance groups where adults and young can join and spread goodwill to the community. The adult cultural dance group goes to different places and functions to perform for donations. These adult performers volunteered their time and talent to act as ambassadors of the association and help the organization raise funds for its projects like college scholarships, supporting public libraries, senior centers and fellow Filipinos who need help in the Philippines. They believe that through their dance, they can spread goodwill to the community and be instrumental to the good causes of the organization.

Lately, the cultural dance group has introduced some cultural dances in a very interesting and unique way. Aside from the traditional cultural dances, they had infused some contemporary modern steps, hip-hop, zumba moves to make some of the folk dances fun to watch. It is just a way for the dance group or the Cultural Dance Committee (CDC) to mix the modern and the traditional dance moves in fun and exciting fashion.


EMCEE: ALEXIS PLAISTED

BULAKLAKAN

HISTORY:

"Bulaklakan" or the dance of flowers is usually held during the month of May in the Philippines as this is the month known when flowers bloom at its best. It is customarily performed in many parts of the Philippines, especially Luzon, as they celebrate the "Santa Cruz de Mayo" dedicated to the Virgin Mary during the Roman Catholic festivity. It is a procession followed by a social gathering where folk dances are being performed in front of the altar usually built by the Hermana Mayor or host of the procession. Bulaklakan, a lovely and attractive dance, is danced for this occasion. The girls in this dance each hold a garland of leaves and flowers attached to a wire, bamboo or rattan so that the garland will arch when held overhead and will gently sway these arcs of garlands to gracefully give honor to Virgin Mary. It is also believed that the name "Bulakalakan" was derived from a town in the Northern Philippines called Bulacan due to the natural floral growth in that area and where this floral dance is performed for social gathering and relaxation after the locale's hard day's work.


Bulaklakan

CHOREOGRAPHY: ENRI FULMORE, BELLE LIMOGE

DANCERS:
Belle Limoge, Annalyn Nauta, Rose Wallace, Enri Fulmore, Jennifer Tettleton, & Esther Adversalo

TINIKLING AND HIP-HOP "BEBOT" FUSION

Another refreshing idea of CDC is to infuse the TINIKLING dance and BEBOT hip-hop dance.

TINIKLING

HISTORY:

This 'Visayan' dance was found in Leyte where this dance originated. Dancers imitate the tikling bird's legendary grace and speed as they skillfully play, chase each other, run over tree branches, or dodge bamboo traps set by rice farmers. Hence it is named after the bird, tikling. this version of the dance is done between a pair of bamboo poles.

The older people claim that the 'Tinikling Ha Bayo' from which the tinikling dance evolved is more difficult to perform. It was originally danced between 'bayuhan', two wooden pestles used to pound the husks off the rice grain.



Tinikling

CHOREOGRAPHY: ENRI FULMORE AND BELLE LIMOGE

DANCERS: Belle Limoge, Enri Fulmore, Jennifer Tettleton
Angelina Flemming, and Janice Ureta-Sanchez

Bamboo Clickers : Cita Lime & JM Ureta


TINIKLING HIP-HOP STYLE "BEBOT"

As a finale of the Cultural Dance Group, they dance TINIKLING ala HIP-HOP style, in the tune of "BEBOT". The crowd joined in the dance and fun!!! The Civic Center Plaza was shaking and everyone had a blast!!


TINIKLING AND HIP-HOP "BEBOT FUSION"

CHOREOGRAPHY: BELLE LIMOGE
RAPPER/IMPERSONATOR: Jonathan Enerva
DANCERS: Belle Limoge, Enri Fulmore, CDC Group, and the groovy crowd!

Bamboo Clickers : Analyn Nauta and Jennifer Tettleton

SALAKOT

HISTORY:

The salakot, usually made with rattan or reeds, is a wide brimmed hat which protects the Filipinos from the heat of the sun and rain. In this dance, the salakot is used to enhance the dance figure and hand movement. This (salakot dance) can be danced by boys and girls, or just girls. The girls wear a Balintawak costume and a pair of wooden slipper (bakya)

Salakot

CHOREOGRAPHY: ENRI FULMORE AND BELLE LIMOGE

DANCERS:
Cita Lime Esther, Adversalo, Lizette Jones Criscelle Santiago, & Rose Wallace

SALAKOT FUSION

This "Salakot" fusion dance is interwoven with flare of zumba and modern dance. Salakot is the Filipino word for a wide-brimmed hat used by farmers and ladies to protect them from the heat of the sun. This time, it will be used with sexy and catchy moves to the delight of the audience.

SALAKOT FUSION


Music: "Love me Right" by the Swag Geeks & Brook Penning
CHOREOGRAPHY: BELLE LIMOGE

DANCERS:
Janice Ureta-Sanche, Jennifer Tettleton, Belle Limoge, & Enri Fulmore

Cariñosa

Cariñosa is a word that describes an affectionate, friendly and lovable woman. This dance is performed in flirtatious manner with fans and handkerchiefs to assist the dancers' hide-and-seek movements. It depicts a man courting a woman with the restriction of touching her. During the Spanish times, it was a grave scandal for a man to touch even the fingertips of a woman thus, in this dance it shows a demure lady protecting herself from the man by using scented fan and and a handkerchief as if playing hide-and-seek.

This dance was originated in the Panay Islands on the Visayan Islands and it was introduced by the Spaniards during their colonization of the Philippines. It is related to some of the Spanish dances like the bolero and the Mexican dance Jarabe Tapatio or the Mexican Hat Dance that resembles the courtship through the interpretation of the dancers in the process of dancing. The dance before was a Maria Clara dance but because of its popularity it has so many versions around the Philippines.

CariƱosa


CHOREOGRAPHY: ENRI FULMORE AND BELLE LIMOGE

DANCERS: Marc Limoge Cita Lime , JM Ureta, & Janice Ureta-Sanchez

Uyaoy/Uyauy
Tribe: Ifugao

HISTORY:

The Ifugao people are said to be the "children of the earth." The term Ifugao is derived from the word ipugao which literally means "coming from the earth." The Spaniards, however, changed it to Ifugaw, a term presently used in referring not only to these people but also to their province.
The Ifugaos of Mayaoyao in Cordillera have hundreds of small and large feasts called canao. Each canao has a different purpose: weddings, hope for a good harvest, success in war, or the death of prominent villagers.

The grandest of all canao is the uayoy. The uyaoy is mainly celebrated by a Kadangyan or chieftain of the village in order to reaffirm his social status in the community and his possible entry to the village's council of elders. Men spread their arms to imitate the sakpaya hawk's majestic glide and stamp their feet to affirm their affinity with the cosmic earth. Uyaoy is a display of various levels of composition, form, depth, and perspective brought by inspiration and gansa-based music.

CHOREOGRAPHY/DANCER: JONATHAN ENERVA

BANGA
Tribe: Kalinga

HISTORY:

"Banga" literally mean pots. The Banga or pot dance is a contemporary performance of Kalinga of the Mountain Province in the Philippines. This dance illustrates the languid grace of a tribe otherwise known as fierce warriors. Heavy earthen pots, as many as seven or eight at a time, are balanced on the heads of maidens as they trudge to the beat of the "gangsa" or wind chimes displaying their stamina and strength as they go about their daily task of fetching water and balancing the banga.

Banga

CHOREOGRAPHY: ENRI FULMORE & BELLE LIMOGE

DANCERS:
Enri Fulmore, Annalyn Nauta, Jennifer Tettleton, Esther adversalo, Cita Lime Janice Ureta-Sanchez, & Belle Limoge (Princess)

BUMAYA

HISTORY:

The Bumayah is an Ifugao dance of thanksgiving to the god Kabunian. In this dance, performed by both men and women, the movements mimic those of a rooster scratching the ground. This joyful dance serves as a prayer of thanksgiving for a bountiful rice harvest.

CHOREOGRAPHY: ENRI FULMORE & BELLE LIMOGE

DANCERS:
Jonathan Enerva, Belle Limoge, Enri Fulmore, Annalyn Nauta, Cita Lime & Jennifer Tettleton

CULTURAL DANCE GROUP MEMBERS MADE IT TO THE NEWSPAPER

During the June 7, 2014, a news writer from the local newspaper, North County Times, got a glimpse of our cultural dancers and featured them in the newspaper!!

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